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Art in the City Tour

Students become artists, connoisseurs and critics on this interactive tour of Toronto’s best public art.

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Duration

2 Hours

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Grade

4-12

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Group Size

up to 150

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Price

$15/student + HST

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Languages

Tours offered in English & French

Tour Info

In the 1960s Torontonians decided that art belonged in public spaces and buildings. And in the 1980s, the city decided that big business should foot the bill. As a result, the Financial District boasts some of the most expensive – and masterful – modern art in Canada. Gaze up at Canada’s biggest indoor mural, explore two hidden art galleries, and learn about the city’s history through its architectural wonders. Don’t forget your camera and sketchpad!

HIGHLIGHTS
• Start at the controversial sculpture that kicked off the public art debate in Toronto in the 1960s
• Sketch or photograph water and rainforest plants in an art-filled garden
• Find a secret message inscribed on Old City Hall by its 19th Century architect
• Climb on the trunk of a life-size elephant
• Compare stunning skyscraper architecture through the decades
• Photograph Santiago Calatrava’s canopy of trees
• See James Turrell’s light installation and David Michael Besant’s tricky flatiron mural

Available in English & French.

**Starts at Nathan Phillips Square. Ends at the funky, local food-tastic St. Lawrence Market, perfect for lunch, with plenty of public picnic tables.

Curriculum Connections

The tour provides opportunities to sketch, photograph and compare art and architecture in public spaces and buildings, including modern art, sculptures, and murals.

Visual Arts: students explore different techniques and materials for creating art, including sketching and photography. Students also learn about the principles of design and explore a range of media and art-making processes. The older students (grades 7 & 8) focus on developing their skills in specific media and styles, and learn about art history, criticism, and aesthetics.

Social Studies: examining the history and development of public art in Toronto, and the city’s architectural heritage. Students learn about the history, geography, and culture of Canada and the world.

Language: students focus on developing their reading comprehension, writing skills, and communication skills.

The tour provides opportunities to sketch, photograph and compare art and architecture in public spaces and buildings, including modern art, sculptures, and murals.

Visual Arts: students explore different techniques and materials for creating art, including sketching and photography. Students focus on developing their skills in specific media and styles, and learn about art history, criticism, and aesthetics.

Social Studies: examining the history and development of public art in Toronto, and the city’s architectural heritage. Students focus on specific areas of history and social studies, such as Canadian history, world history, geography, and civics.

Language: students continue to develop their communication and literacy skills, with a focus on specific genres and types of writing, as well as critical thinking and media literacy.

How to Prepare your class, and what to bring on the day of the tour

When teachers book a tour for their class they will receive an information package that will:
-> outline any in-class preparation activities to be done prior to the tour
-> list materials & items that students should bring on the day of the tour

Testimonials

“Our students enjoyed all aspects of the walk, but if I had to pick a favourite, it would be the reporter-on-the-street activity. We were amazed how they took to it and the courage they demonstrated in approaching the public. The follow up assignments were excellent also. We had them complete the news article as individuals and the advertising assignment in their groups. The rubrics were also well thought out.”

–Alison D, Grade 8 Teacher, Bloordale MS, Etobicoke, ON

“The Green walk was fantastic! It had strong curriculum links for what we cover in class, i.e. ecological footprint and sustainability, as well as alternative land uses and urban planning.”

–Kim E, Head of Geography, Thornhill Secondary School